You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence,” acclaimed science fiction writer Octavia Butler once said about creating stories. Indeed, writing is never easy, and the task of worldbuilding isn’t a walk in the park either.

 

Creating a world for your story often begins with a blank page, but don’t worry, NRM is here to assist you in writing the perfect worldbuilding for your narrative with these four tips.

 

  1. SO WHAT KIND OF WORLD DO YOU WANT?

Can you imagine a gloomy town, with the sun barely shining like Forks (the town in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series) set in a different story, say C.S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia? Notice the descriptive difference between the two?

 

The world you create in your story should always aim to help with the story. There are many types of world you can build into your narrative: from the surreal and mythical world where witches can roam freely to the vibrant and oddly hued surroundings where every beast is a friend. Be creative and pour all those ideas out!

 

Also, don’t forget that the greatest inspiration you can base your world on is the one you are living in right now.

 

  1. SET A SHAPE ON THE BACKGROUND

The background is one of the essential elements in worldbuilding. Politics, hierarchy, the environment, culture, gender, and species are what create a world. Balance out each element by showing its pros and cons. Create a history for this world and write from its perspective.

 

Hogwarts won’t be the Hogwarts most of us dreamt of stepping inside if not for its elaborate history. The Shire wouldn’t even work if not written well on paper. Set a shape on the background of your world in the sense that there should be a set of established rules.

 

  1. AIM TO CONVINCE/ EACH SENSE CAN HELP THE LIE

The trickiest part in the art of Worldbuilding is creating an image in the reader’s mind with words. The power to manipulate and convince your readers isn’t exactly something you can practice in your writing in a day. Satisfying the five sensestouch, taste, smell, sight, and hearingshould progress your made-up world into a more convincing setting.

 

It is best not to rely too much on epigraphs on the world because the reader can only hold so much information. Worldbuilding adds richness to the story, but it doesn’t mean that the world should be too emphasized in writing.

 

  1. KEEP IT GROUNDED

Fantasy and science fiction writer Brandon Anderson once said, “The purpose of a storyteller is not to tell you how to think, but to give you questions to think upon.”

 

A writer neither needs to bombard every phrase with all the fancy words nor does he/she need to hold academic accolades to be considered a good one. Sometimes, what makes up good writing is the ability to stir emotions with a play of words. Keep your world grounded in the story.

 

Don’t forget, great storytellers know when to end a story! Scribble a world where readers wouldn’t want to leave even if the story already ended.

 

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